Info For Neighbors

VARIOUS NUMBERED ITEMS OF INTEREST,

JUST SCROLL DOWN:

1. HURRICANE PREPEREDNESS

THEY SELDOM HAPPEN HERE, BUT...

The last major hurricane to hit St. Petersburg directly was an unnamed category 4 storm in 1946. But even lesser hurricanes and tropical storms can create problems. Fortunately, Historic Kenwood is well situated away from the water and is not in an evacuation zone. But we do have lots of trees in our neighborhood, and nearly every home and garden contains objects that can turn into missiles in high wind. Advance preparation is the best way to minimize damage and loss in the event of a hurricane.

City of St. Petersburg Hurricane Information - This website offers a wealth of information including what you can do to protect yourself, your pets and your property, and what services the city and state provide, and more.

Prepare Your Home for Hurricane Season - A document prepared by Kenwood resident Paul Dickens. This gives instructions with photos, showing how to reinforce your roof/attic, protect windows and vents, and strap down fences.

2. THE KENWOOD EXCHANGE

The Kenwood Exchange is a flexible, non-monetary neighborhood resource directory and listserv, where people list their skills/interests, tools they're interested in sharing, and things they are either looking to trade for or need help with. These "exchanges" could be direct barter--say, an hour of yard work for an hour of computer repair--or more generalized, such as a group work day, or simply borrowing a tool for a project. The idea is to bring neighbors together in new ways and utilize the diverse social resources we have in the neighborhood. 
 
All neighborhood residents are welcome. You don't have to have any special or unique skills or fancy tools to participate. The only restriction is that exchanges should be non-monetary. For more information or to be added to the Kenwood Exchange, please email Dave Himmelfarb at davehimmelfarb@gmail.com
 
The Historic Kenwood Neighborhood Association makes no claims to the quality of work or is responsible for any damage that might result from work done by anyone found through this "Exchange" service. We merely put out the word that this service exists. As with the hiring of anyone to work for you or on your home, do your homework, ask for references, and get the opinion of several people. Always remember to file any appropriate permits with the city when doing work on your home. 
 

3. THINKING ABOUT RAISING BACKYARD CHICKENS?

The city of St. Petersburg allows homeowners to raise up to 5 chickens(no roosters) in a coop/pen. Several neighbors already have done this and have fresh eggs every day. To see a presentation developed by Eric & Anna, two of our Historic Kenwood residents, on this backyard practice, click here.  Another good resource is: www.BackyardChickens.com

4. MY HOME'S HISTORY

If you are interested in researching your home's history. Here is a pamphlet and another from the city of St. Pete that will help guide you thru this process. 
Useful links:

familysearch.org  A free genealogy site done by the Church of Jesus Christ, of Latter Day Saints, and it includes census records, which can be useful if you are searching a particular resident of a home.
http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074228/00004/allvolumes?search=sanborn
UF’s collection of Sanborn Maps
http://cms.uflib.ufl.edu/maps/Index.aspx
UF’s collection of historical aerial photos
https://fdotewp1.dot.state.fl.us/AerialPhotoLookUpSystem/
The FDOT database of aerials is called A-PLUS.  Users can create a free account for more access, which allows them to search by year and area of interest.
To find out about accessing County Records (such as deeds filed before 1970 and tax rolls 1912-2004) on microfilm in person, contact orcopy@co.pinellas.fl.us or 727.464.7000
City of St. Petersburg Historic Research Library
http://www.stpete.org/history_and_preservation/historic_research_library.php
Google News Archive Search
https://news.google.com/newspapers?hl=en
St. Pete. Museum of History, Flickr site, Homes Album
https://www.flickr.com/photos/spmoh-archives/albums/72157664226192152
Occasionally addresses and the names of a particular home owner will appear in older editions of the St. Pete Times or Evening Independent.
 

5. NATIONAL REGISTRY OF HISTORIC PLACES

Historic Kenwood is listed on the National Registry of Historic Places. The city of St. Pete has created this pamphlet to describe just what that means.

6. LOCAL HISTORIC DISTRICT

Historic Kenwood is NOT listed as a local historic district. The city has created this pamphlet to describe just what that would mean.

7. OLD HOUSE PLANS

Many of our older homes were kit homes. These houses were built on site, but were bought as a kit with all the plans and materials coming from one source at the same time. Sears and Aladdin were two of the most famous. To look at some of these house plans, maybe even finding yours, click here. Or try one of these websites:

http://www.pinterest.com/AlanaghM/sears-kit-homes/

http://www.searshomes.org/

8. CRAFTSMAN HOUSE BUILDING IS A HISTORIC LANDMARK

The Craftsman House, located at 2955 Central Ave. is a retail art gallery, cafe and onsite pottery studio, but the building itself has a long history that includes a local historic designation by the city of St. Petersburg in 1994. To read about the history of this great example of a craftsman bungalow, click here.

9. OLD HOUSE INFORMATION

Looking for information on bungalows, fireplaces, historic colors, home history, wallpapers, or just on living in an old house, try Classic Bungalows.

10. LEAF BLOWERS

Did you know it is illegal to blow leaves in the street? Click here for the city's rules.

11. PROTECTING YOUR HOME FROM VARMINTS

Many small critters may find there way into your home. For tips on protecting your home, click here

12. PARKING REGULATIONS

To check the rules fior parking in the neighborhood and the rest of the city, click here.

13. ILLEGAL TREE REMOVAL

As a reminder to St. Petersburg residents and businesses, permits are required before removing any protected tree species with a trunk of at least 4 inches in diameter. The requirement for a permit applies regardless of whether the tree is healthy, diseased or dead. Protected trees include: ash (prickly/wild lime), bay (red), buttonwood, cedar, cypress, dogwood, elm, hickory (pignut), holly, magnolia, maple, oak, palm (royal or cabbage), pines, plum (chickasaw or flatwoods), mulberry (red), sea grape, sugarberry, sweet gum, sycamore, tupelo and willow. Also, nonresidential property owners cannot remove without a permit trees that were installed as part of the required landscaping when the site was developed. To obtain a tree removal permit, e-mail trees@st.pete.org or call (727) 893-7471. To report an illegal tree removal, call the Codes Compliance Assistance Department at (727) 893-7373. Reports can be given anonymously.

14. THE CRAFTSMAN BLOG

This blog has weekly restoration and renovation tips for old house owners and is run by a man here in Florida. 

15. OLD HOUSE WEB

Ideas and advice for old house enthusiasts. There is also a very active forum. Click here.

16. OLD HOUSE JOURNAL

Professional advice on everything related to old homes from paint color to kitchens, landscaping to tile to help with renovation. Click here.

17. ALLEY RECYCLING 

In order to increase recycling participation and to make it more convenient for residents who currently have their trash picked up in the alley, the city will begin alley recycling collection on Monday, January 25, 2016. Alley collection will begin on your designated recycling day. For answers to requently asked questions, click here.

18. A HISTORY OF THE RISE AND FALL OF THE MAIL-ORDER HOME

There are a few homes in the neighborhood that built as kits. This a great history of that home building method. Click here.

19. A GUIDE TO LIVING WITH URBAN COYOTES

Yes, we do have coyotes in Historic Kenwood. They are in all parts of Florida in fact. There is nothing to be afraid of, but there are some things you should know about living with them. Click here.

20.  NEW PROPOSSED RESIDENTIAL LDR UPDATES

The city is propossing changes to the codes that regulate new home construction in the city. These will help mus keep the character of our neighborhood by having new construction of homes bettr fit in with the size and scope of what's already ben built. Click here. Bob Jeffery and a committee made up of residents of other traditional neighborhoods gave their thoughts to these changes. Click here.